Windows server 2000 and sql licensing two copies is it legal?

We have all legal licenses for both products. I am looking at loading the same software onto a disaster recovery machine which will sit dormant until our main server one day fails. I will then boot the "dormant server" load the previous days backup and then continue running our company. Is it legal to have one license on 2 copies of the same software?

Are your licences CAL or per processor? If it’s per processor then there’s no way to argue you don’t need mulitple licences. However, if you’ve got CAL licence then the one sitting on DR has no connections and isn’t active so shouldn’t need a licence.

No doubt if you ask MS they will insist you have licences for both.

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OccumsRevelation says:

Windows 2000 server, you will need a second license.

You mentioned a SQL license as well, though. SQL Server used to come with five licenses to connect with automatically (been awhile, but that probably hasn’t changed). If all you’re doing is connecting to it on the second machine, you’re probably fine.
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Krop says:

Are your licences CAL or per processor? If it’s per processor then there’s no way to argue you don’t need mulitple licences. However, if you’ve got CAL licence then the one sitting on DR has no connections and isn’t active so shouldn’t need a licence.

No doubt if you ask MS they will insist you have licences for both.
References :

mr_krabs says:

If you install a product on two different machines then you have to have license for both copies regardless of the fact that your standby machine won’t be running at the same time as the main system. If you don’t want to buy an extra licence then you would have to install the software onto the standby machine when you need to use it or ghost the configured main machine and load the ghost image onto the standby machine when you need it. It’s a bit like if you own a TV you have to have a license for it regardless if it is never used !
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